Category Archives: Curation

Photo Essay on Madanpur Khadar JJ Colony

Please see below a Photo Essay by photographer Rohit Madan, including a 360 degree view of a busy crossroad in Madanpur Khadar JJ Colony, New Delhi, India, one of the areas our ‘Gendering the Smart City’ project is focusing on.

The photo essay forms part of our #GSCProject #AanaJaana exhibition taking place in Mandi House metro station, New Delhi from 1 to 31 January 2019. You can read more about the exhibition here and explore and share our exhibition event Facebook page here

Delhi Workshop: Gendering the Smart Safe City

Curating Digital Lives for a Feminist Urban Future

13th December 2018, India International Centre, New Delhi

This workshop seeks to establish an alternative framework for curating the smart safe city. It aims to engender current smart city agendas through young women’s everyday experiences of navigating the city. It will present different perspectives of mobility and safety generated by young women through participatory maps, photographs, videos and WhatsApp diaries maintained over a period of time. In doing so, it explores how women on the margins view, understand, and ultimately navigate the city through information and communication technologies (ICT) accessed from low-cost (and often low-tech) mobile phones.  It provokes us to think what safety means in a context where social media provides real time information on the dangers and freedoms located in the metro, bus, auto rickshaw, and walkways as well as the opportunity to express this in creative and poignant ways. It invites us to think how women living on the urban peripheries negotiate the ‘freedoms’ of moving in online space with the ‘dangers’ of going out into the city, or the limitations of engaging via digital technologies with the freedom of stepping out of one’s home. Through a convergence of artistic practice, digital media and architecture, this workshop will demonstrate the potential of a new kind of visual language of safety that is co-produced with the women. It will reveal the capacity of this language to move beyond existing data on gendered violence to highlight the gendered and socio-economic patterns of inclusions and exclusions brought about by a digital urban age.


As part of the United Nations #16DaysOfActivisim, we launched a hip hop song ‘Khadar ki Ladkiyan’ [Khadar Girls] co-written and co-produced with our participants at the event. See our Story Map of the process here.

Read the workshop concept note here.

Explore the event Wakelet with all of the Tweets before and during the workshop here

Watch our workshop videos featuring our #GSCProject team members and workshop participants – project societal partners, academics, experts, practitioners and community stakeholders – who joined us on the day below:

Read the workshop report by Project Research Assistant Arya Thomas here.

Programme

MORNING SESSION

9.30-10.00Participants start arriving with tea and coffee served
Project Outline and Findings
Chair: Kalpana Viswanath
  
10.00-10.30Dr. Ayona Datta (Principal Investigator), Reader in Urban Futures, King’s College London
Gendering the Smart City: Curating Gendered Digital Life in the Margins
10.30-10.45Dr. Padmini Ray Murray (Co-Investigator), Digital Humanities Course Leader, Srishti School of Art and Design, Bangalore
Sharing and Making Digital Knowledge: Using Wikipedia
10.45-11.00

Arya Thomas (Research Assistant) 

WhatsApping and Rapping with Young Women in Delhi’s Peripheries

11.00-11.15Rwitee Mandal, Safetipin (project societal partner)
Gendered Safety Maps of the Unmapped Peripheries
11.15-11.45Q & A
11.45-12.00Break for coffee and tea
Right to Urban Technologies
Chair: Padmini Ray Murray
 
12.00-12.15Sarita Baloni, Researcher, Jagori (project societal partner) 
Working with Youth and Technology in the urban peripheries
12.15-12.30Swati Janu, Senior Designer, mHS CITY LABS and Lecturer in Architectural Design, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi
Memory Cards and Vernacular Media 
12.30-12.45Krishna Menon, Professor, School of Human Studies, Ambedkar University
Gender and the Smart City
12.45-13.00Nayanatara Ranganathan, Manager, Freedom of Expression programme, Internet Democracy Project
Surveillance-As-Safety in Hi-Tech India
13.00-13.30Q & A
13.30-14.15Lunch

AFTERNOON SESSION

Curating the City with Art and Architecture
Chair: Ayona Datta
14.15-14.45Khadar Ki Ladki’ launch of music video and Q & A with participants and sound artist Sunayana
14.45-15.00Kruttika Susarla, Graphic Designer and Comic Artist
The Personal is Political
15.00-15.15Shveta Mathur, Visiting Faculty, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi and Coordinator, Urban Design Studio
Student Design Interventions in Khadar
15.15-15.30Sameera Jain, Filmmaker, Editor and Course Director, Creative Documentary program, Sri Aurobindo Centre for Arts and Communication, New Delhi
About My Own City
15.30-16.00Q & A
16.00-16.15Break for coffee and tea
16.15-17.15Roundtable Discussion on Gendering the Indian Smart City: Contexts, Challenges and Future Directions
Moderator: Kalpana Viswanath, Co-Founder and CEO, Safetipin 
Janaki Abraham, Associate Professor in Sociology, Department of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
Anjilee Aggarwal, Director, Samarthyam
Sohini Bhattacharya, President and CEO, Breakthrough
Mriganka Saxena, Founder, HTAU (Habitat Tectonics Architecture and Urbanism) 
17.15-17.30Final reflections and moving on to next phase of project
Ayona Datta and Padmini Ray Murray

Funded by: Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), UK 

Co-convened by King’s College London and Safetipin, Delhi

Local partners: Jagori and School of Planning and Architecture, Delhi

 

Curating the Gendered City with WhatsApp

Arya Thomas, Project Research Assistant

The research network primarily involves working with millennials from a resettlement colony in Delhi. We decided to use WhatsApp Diaries as a form of interaction with each other, as a medium to curate and co-produce the idea of gendered mobility and safety through text and images. Since the use of cheap smart and feature phones and access to internet technology has proliferated in South Asian economies, this also allowed for a process of documentation of the project in the virtual domain.

WhatsApp Diaries

The basic idea in the diaries is to share experiences of safety, discomfort, pleasure and risk with each other in the form of audio recordings, pictures and videos from the city as these girls navigate the city everyday. We are building a thick narrative of the city from the perspective of young girls who live on the margins of the city. As mobile phones have become an intrinsic part of our lives, one had to think of ways to ‘involve’ the medium actively in this research project. Many engagements and conversations take place through the phone- from access to public services to job opportunities, to discovering and finding new friends, to narratives of discomfort in these interactions, the phone and internet are crucial to the merging subjectivity in the neo-liberal order.

Till now, the WhatsApp timeline has been primarily marked by experiences\instances on infrastructure, politics and safety. A rain in the city would flood the whatsapp group with images of water logging in the locality or in areas where they would be navigating, giving a scathing critique of the state of public infrastructure and lacunas in planning the smart city. Easy access to affordable public transport in another issue that has come up again and again in our discussions.

Baarish‘Delhi rains’ from participants’ WhatsApp diaries. Collage by Ayona Datta.

Gendered Safety 

The issue of safety seems to emerge often enmeshed with questions of infrastructure and other community ethos in the city. While the lack of proper lighting and narrow\dark lanes are a constant source of anxiety, a substantial feeling of safety also emerges from perceptions prevalent in the society along with other socio-economic issues. The persistent complaint that ‘boys who take drugs\alcohol’ often crowd in certain lanes, or stand around in deserted areas, the complaint about how one has to take long routes and avoid shorter unsafe routes; all underline the immense precariousness of everyday mobility.

The participants definitely should not be seen as ‘helpless victims’ rather there is often sharing of what they did to avoid a certain situation, that they are not constrained by these structural issues, rather, alone or collectively, women are trying to devise ways to fight it or negotiate it.

The role of community and family in controlling women’s mobility is something that is recurrent in both the whatsApp diaries as well as group discussions.  Our WhatsApp diaries, like all WhatsApp groups in the subcontinent has also been flooded with an interesting set of forwarded messages or fake news propaganda – in that sense, we are never in isolation of the political contexts that mars all our lives constantly. There is a steady inflow of political propaganda that comes through, some of them would reflect the schisms within as discussions unfold or erupt.

Below are some of the narratives in the diaries.

“Sheher (city)- where no one listens to you – I got on a bus, on the bus stop from Okhla tank, near Harkesh Nagar to go to Chidiya Ghar, he shut the gate so hard that I fell and my phone broke. I complaint on 100, called on 181, I also got a traffic police number, but no one listened to me” (27th June, 2:47 pm)
“Hello friends, if you know of any jobs, then let me know, I’m very troubled – I left the job in July and I’m trying but also very troubled” (23rd August, 9:07 pm)
“I’m sitting on a rickshaw for Okhla phase 2, and the driver is a woman! It makes me really happy, and she’s riding it very calmly!” (9th July, 1:49 pm – didn’t have space in phone to send an audio recording)

These quotes give a sense of the conversations that unfold between young girls living in Delhi’s urban margins – spatially, economically and socially. They access the city from their subject positions, through the knowledge (and power) garnered via these whatsApp groups, and the city is playing a constant role in moulding and shaping that knowledge, power and subjectivity. These conversations also talk to us about the necessity of seeing the linkage between various aspects that govern a woman life, and her access to a ‘freer’ life, which includes livelihood, education and easy mobility, giving a more comprehensive notion to empowerment and women’s rights.